Monday, August 29, 2016

EPA proposes plan for long-awaited Kanawha dioxin cleanup

More than a dozen years after they promised to more thoroughly investigate the problem, government regulators and Monsanto Co. are joining in a proposed plan to clean up dioxin contamination from the sediment in a 14-mile stretch of the Kanawha River west of Charleston.
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency revealed late last week that the parties all prefer an alternative that would install stone caps over certain contaminated spots in the river sediment, rather than conducting a broader and more expensive dredging project to remove material contaminated with toxic dioxin pollution from Monsanto’s former chemical plant in Nitro and from the company’s waste dumps in the area.
The EPA published a short public notice about the proposal in the Gazette-Mail Thursday, and it made available a nearly 1,500-page report that describes the study of the contamination and the consideration of various alternatives for cleaning it up.
“This was done over several years and much, much discussion,” said Joseph Gabriel, environmental remediation manager for Monsanto. “All of the options were evaluated, and the overall opinion was this was the best alternative.”
Jake McDougal, a program manager with the Department of Environmental Protection Office of Environmental Remediation, said Friday that the proposal is “a consensus agreement” between federal and state officials and Monsanto.
The cleanup — covering an area of the Kanawha to the Winfield Lock and Dam — would address toxic contamination of the river that dates back many decades, to when Monsanto began in the late 1940s to make a powerful herbicide ingredient called 2,4,5-T.
In its best-known use, the federal government bought 2,4,5-T to make Agent Orange, the defoliant deployed widely in the Vietnam War. Monsanto’s 2,4,5-T was contaminated with a highly toxic dioxin compound known as 2,3,7,8-TCDD.
Dioxin has been linked to cancer, birth defects, learning disabilities, endometriosis, infertility and suppressed immune functions. The chemical builds up in tissue over time, meaning that even small exposures can accumulate to dangerous levels.
- See more at: http://www.wvgazettemail.com/news-business/20160827/epa-proposes-plan-for-long-awaited-kanawha-dioxin-cleanup#sthash.7tSLoAry.dpuf
More than a dozen years after they promised to more thoroughly investigate the problem, government regulators and Monsanto Co. are joining in a proposed plan to clean up dioxin contamination from the sediment in a 14-mile stretch of the Kanawha River west of Charleston.
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency revealed late last week that the parties all prefer an alternative that would install stone caps over certain contaminated spots in the river sediment, rather than conducting a broader and more expensive dredging project to remove material contaminated with toxic dioxin pollution from Monsanto’s former chemical plant in Nitro and from the company’s waste dumps in the area.

The EPA published a short public notice about the proposal in the Gazette-Mail Thursday, and it made available a nearly 1,500-page report that describes the study of the contamination and the consideration of various alternatives for cleaning it up.
“This was done over several years and much, much discussion,” said Joseph Gabriel, environmental remediation manager for Monsanto. “All of the options were evaluated, and the overall opinion was this was the best alternative.”
Jake McDougal, a program manager with the Department of Environmental Protection Office of Environmental Remediation, said Friday that the proposal is “a consensus agreement” between federal and state officials and Monsanto.
The cleanup — covering an area of the Kanawha to the Winfield Lock and Dam — would address toxic contamination of the river that dates back many decades, to when Monsanto began in the late 1940s to make a powerful herbicide ingredient called 2,4,5-T.
In its best-known use, the federal government bought 2,4,5-T to make Agent Orange, the defoliant deployed widely in the Vietnam War. Monsanto’s 2,4,5-T was contaminated with a highly toxic dioxin compound known as 2,3,7,8-TCDD.
Dioxin has been linked to cancer, birth defects, learning disabilities, endometriosis, infertility and suppressed immune functions. The chemical builds up in tissue over time, meaning that even small exposures can accumulate to dangerous levels.

More than a dozen years after they promised to more thoroughly investigate the problem, government regulators and Monsanto Co. are joining in a proposed plan to clean up dioxin contamination from the sediment in a 14-mile stretch of the Kanawha River west of Charleston.
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency revealed late last week that the parties all prefer an alternative that would install stone caps over certain contaminated spots in the river sediment, rather than conducting a broader and more expensive dredging project to remove material contaminated with toxic dioxin pollution from Monsanto’s former chemical plant in Nitro and from the company’s waste dumps in the area.
The EPA published a short public notice about the proposal in the Gazette-Mail Thursday, and it made available a nearly 1,500-page report that describes the study of the contamination and the consideration of various alternatives for cleaning it up.
“This was done over several years and much, much discussion,” said Joseph Gabriel, environmental remediation manager for Monsanto. “All of the options were evaluated, and the overall opinion was this was the best alternative.”
Jake McDougal, a program manager with the Department of Environmental Protection Office of Environmental Remediation, said Friday that the proposal is “a consensus agreement” between federal and state officials and Monsanto.
The cleanup — covering an area of the Kanawha to the Winfield Lock and Dam — would address toxic contamination of the river that dates back many decades, to when Monsanto began in the late 1940s to make a powerful herbicide ingredient called 2,4,5-T.
In its best-known use, the federal government bought 2,4,5-T to make Agent Orange, the defoliant deployed widely in the Vietnam War. Monsanto’s 2,4,5-T was contaminated with a highly toxic dioxin compound known as 2,3,7,8-TCDD.
Dioxin has been linked to cancer, birth defects, learning disabilities, endometriosis, infertility and suppressed immune functions. The chemical builds up in tissue over time, meaning that even small exposures can accumulate to dangerous levels.
- See more at: http://www.wvgazettemail.com/news-business/20160827/epa-proposes-plan-for-long-awaited-kanawha-dioxin-cleanup#sthash.7tSLoAry.dpuf
More than a dozen years after they promised to more thoroughly investigate the problem, government regulators and Monsanto Co. are joining in a proposed plan to clean up dioxin contamination from the sediment in a 14-mile stretch of the Kanawha River west of Charleston.
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency revealed late last week that the parties all prefer an alternative that would install stone caps over certain contaminated spots in the river sediment, rather than conducting a broader and more expensive dredging project to remove material contaminated with toxic dioxin pollution from Monsanto’s former chemical plant in Nitro and from the company’s waste dumps in the area.
The EPA published a short public notice about the proposal in the Gazette-Mail Thursday, and it made available a nearly 1,500-page report that describes the study of the contamination and the consideration of various alternatives for cleaning it up.
“This was done over several years and much, much discussion,” said Joseph Gabriel, environmental remediation manager for Monsanto. “All of the options were evaluated, and the overall opinion was this was the best alternative.”
Jake McDougal, a program manager with the Department of Environmental Protection Office of Environmental Remediation, said Friday that the proposal is “a consensus agreement” between federal and state officials and Monsanto.
The cleanup — covering an area of the Kanawha to the Winfield Lock and Dam — would address toxic contamination of the river that dates back many decades, to when Monsanto began in the late 1940s to make a powerful herbicide ingredient called 2,4,5-T.
In its best-known use, the federal government bought 2,4,5-T to make Agent Orange, the defoliant deployed widely in the Vietnam War. Monsanto’s 2,4,5-T was contaminated with a highly toxic dioxin compound known as 2,3,7,8-TCDD.
Dioxin has been linked to cancer, birth defects, learning disabilities, endometriosis, infertility and suppressed immune functions. The chemical builds up in tissue over time, meaning that even small exposures can accumulate to dangerous levels.
- See more at: http://www.wvgazettemail.com/news-business/20160827/epa-proposes-plan-for-long-awaited-kanawha-dioxin-cleanup#sthash.7tSLoAry.dpuf

It may be time to review your medical records

Nowadays it seems like pretty much everything can kill you. Don’t smoke, don’t eat fast food, don’t drink alcohol or you’ll die an early, agonizing death.
Personally, I intend on going down like my idol — George Burns — drinking whiskey and smoking cigars when I’m 100 and laughing at the poor people who still died young while never actually enjoying life. But with all the things I get to report on, my concerns for my health and well-being tend not to revolve around the more accepted cancer-causing vices.
In the Vietnam era, our veterans developed some major health issues because of the use of Agent Orange. My wife’s uncle died from the long-term health effects caused by Agent Orange, and all the Vietnam veterans I know who were exposed have serious health issues because of it.
For some of us slightly younger guys, the next big concern was the forced application of anthrax shots. Quite a few veterans developed symptoms of what was labeled Gulf War Syndrome, a medical condition causing fatigue, chronic headaches and skin and respiratory disorders. Some of the long-term side effects of the anthrax shot series are very similar.

Thursday, August 25, 2016

Exclusive: Monsanto pulls new GM cotton seed from India in protest

READ THE STORY

Monsanto Co (MON.N) has withdrawn an application seeking approval for its next generation of genetically modified cotton seeds in India, a major escalation in a long-running dispute between New Delhi and the world's biggest seed maker.
A letter sent by Monsanto's local partner in India, the conglomerate's biggest market outside the Americas, strongly objects to a government proposal that would force Monsanto to share its technology with local seed companies.
The company is also at loggerheads with India over how much it can charge for its genetically modified cotton seeds, costing it tens of millions of dollars in lost revenue every year.
The unprecedented decision to pull the application, which has not previously been reported, could set back Monsanto's efforts to introduce its new seed, called Bollgard II Roundup Ready Flex technology, for years and lead to further losses.
It will also ratchet up pressure on the Indian government, as it undermines Prime Minister Narendra Modi's efforts to make the country look more attractive to foreign investors.
It could also hurt Indian cotton farmers. The new seed variety helps fight against weeds that sap the cotton crop of vital nutrients and depress yields.
A Monsanto spokesman said the withdrawal of the application was "an outcome of the uncertainty in the business and regulatory environment", but that the move had "no impact on our current cotton portfolio being sold in India".
A spokesman for the environment ministry, which had the application before it, was not available for comment.
In a letter, dated July 5, Maharashtra Hybrid Seeds Co Ltd (Mahyco), Monsanto's technology partner in India, singled out a government proposal, mooted in May, that would require Monsanto to share its proprietary technology.
MORE

Scientists are linking chemicals produced in the 1970s to increased autism today—not vaccines

Serious researchers have been able to correlate fetal exposure to chemical compounds called organochlorine chemicals with an 80 percent increase in a future autism diagnosis. Kristen Lyall, ScD, is an assistant professor in Drexel University’s A.J. Drexel Autism Institute. 
Although production of organochlorine chemicals was banned in the United States in 1977, these compounds can remain in the environment and become absorbed in the fat of animals that humans eat, leading to exposure.
[...]
"There's a fair amount of research examining exposure to these chemicals during pregnancy in association with other outcomes, like birth weight -- but little research on autism, specifically," Lyall said. "To examine the role of environmental exposures in risk of autism, it is important that samples are collected during time frames with evidence for susceptibility for autism -- termed 'critical windows' in neurodevelopment. Fetal development is one of those critical windows."
Researchers and scientists from California’s Department of Public Health, members of Kaiser Permanente’s Division of Research and numerous others have released a paper—“Polychlorinated Biphenyl and Organochlorine Pesticide Concentrations in Maternal Mid-Pregnancy Serum Samples: Association with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Intellectual Disability”—describing their findings.

Wednesday, August 24, 2016

Upcoming Agent Orange Town Hall Meetings








Town Hall Meeting Calendar:

August 25, 2016
Long Beach, California
Contact: Max Stewart aircop72@gmail.com

 August 27, 2016
St. Louis, Missouri
Contact: Bill Kiefer kiefervva794@yahoo.com

August 27, 2016
Taylor, Michigan
Contact: Mike Goodpaster Gunnersmate235@gmail.com

September 7, 2016
Kalispell, Montana
Contact: Willa Burgess vvamontanasc@yahoo.com

September 7, 2016
Hamilton, Montana

September 18, 2016
Kenilworth, New Jersey
Michael Eckstein, mre1065@gmail.com

September 19, 2016
The Villages, Florida
Contact: Robert Przybylski robertprz@centurylink.net

September 20, 2016
Daytona Beach, Florida
Contact: Rod Phillips cobra101st@gmail.com

September 21, 2016
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
Contact: Stephen Bowers sbowers@semtribe.com

September 22, 2016
Port Charlotte, Florida
Contact: Tim Phillips tmc36@comcast.net

September 23, 2016
St Petersburg, Florida
Contact: Mike Bousher president@vvafsc.org

October 1, 2016
Tulsa, Oklahoma
Contact: Nate Washington Natewash51@att.net
Lew Broughton lewb5834@gmail.com